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Retirement Investment Advisors, Inc. Names Andrew Flinton, CFP® President

Andrew

Randy Thurman, CFP® has been appointed Chief Executive Officer. Founder Joe Bowie, CFP® moves to a Senior Advisor role. These leadership appointments are effective immediately.

“We are fortunate to have someone with Andrew’s experience and vision to continue our legacy,” said CEO Randy Thurman, CFP®. “Andrew’s unique combination of integrity, intellect, and charisma make him the perfect person to lead us as we embark on our next chapter.”

Flinton said, “I’ve been blessed with great mentors and a talented group of professionals. We are excited to continue to work together to make Retirement Investment Advisors the top fee-only firm in Oklahoma.”

Flinton is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional and has worked as a comprehensive financial planner since 2008. He holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of Oklahoma.  He serves as a member of the Investment Policy Committee for Retirement Investment Advisors and is directly involved in the investment selection and allocation guidelines for the firm. Andrew is a volunteer and Board member for Tenaciously Teal, a non-profit that supports those during their fight with cancer.  He has also been involved with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, American Cancer Society, and has served as a volunteer at OU Children’s Hospital.   Andrew lives in Edmond with his wife Courtney and their two daughters.  

Based in Oklahoma City, with offices in Edmond and Frisco, Texas, Retirement Investment Advisors, Inc. is set apart because all of their financial advisors are CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals, which requires additional training and certification. They have been cited by more than 35* national publications as one of the nation’s top financial planning companies.

*Criteria available upon request

 

 

Blog

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/09/16

08/09/2016
It’s déjà vu all over again! The Chicago Board of Options Exchange (CBOE) Volatility Index, also known as the VIX, tracks the prices of options on the Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) Index. Since options often are used to hedge portfolio risk, the VIX is considered to be a ‘fear gauge’ that has value with regard to market volatility during the next 30 days. The VIX moves higher when investors are worried and lower when they’re feeling content. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/02/16

08/02/2016
Here’s a brain tickler for you: In July 2016, there were four. In June 2016, there were 10. Since 2008, there have been 673! What are they? If you guessed central bank rate cuts, you are on the money. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary - 7/26/16

07/28/2016
The Markets Like a cool breeze on a hot day, the post-Brexit market rally has soothed investors. The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), also known as the fear gauge, fell significantly during the past few weeks, according to CNBC.com. The VIX measures investors’ concerns about future volatility. The lower the Index is; the calmer investors are about the future. In late June, the VIX rose as high as 25.76. Last week, it hovered around 12. Barron’s reported the latest advisory sentiment reading Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 07/19/16

07/19/2016
“Start your engines,” was not in the Department of Labor (DOL)’s June Employment Report Summary, but it may as well have been. A positive jobs report revved investor optimism and sent U.S. stock markets sprinting higher last week. Job growth was strong in June with 287,000 new jobs created. That helped soothe worries raised by a less than stellar May jobs report. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 07/12/16

07/12/2016
When the yield on 10-year Treasuries finished last week at 1.37 percent, a record closing low, Barron’s called it a Kübler-Ross rally. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross was a Swiss psychiatrist whose research identified the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. According to Barron’s, institutional money managers have reached the final stage of grief and accepted that bond yields may remain low for some time. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary-07/06/16

07/06/2016
Second quarter ended with a spectacular finale of Brexit-inspired market volatility. Investors typically welcome sharp market movements with about the same level of enthusiasm that canines show for fireworks. However, recent market agitations highlighted a key tenet of investing: Volatility often creates opportunity. Following an initial Brexit sell-off, global markets rebounded. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 06/28/16

06/28/2016
SURPRISE! Britain is leaving the European Union (EU) after 40 years of membership. Last Thursday, almost three-fourths of voters in Britain – about 30 million people, according to the BBC – cast ballots to determine whether the United Kingdom would remain in the EU. By a slim margin, the British people opted out. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary-06/21/16

06/21/2016
The world’s stock markets took it on the chin last week. A one-two punch was delivered with the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting leading and concerns Britain will leave the European Union following. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary-06/14/16

06/14/2016
The British may be leaving. The British may be leaving. Last week, the interest rate on 10-year U.S. Treasuries dropped to levels last seen in 2013. Why, you may ask, would bond yields move lower when Federal Reserve policy is to push interest rates higher? The answer can be found across the pond. On June 23, the United Kingdom, a.k.a. Britain, will vote on whether the country should remain in the European Union (EU) or leave. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 06/07/16

06/07/2016
Statistics means never having to say you're certain, and that was certainly true last week. The employment report, which was released on Friday, was a bit short on jobs. Analysts had predicted employers would add about 162,000 new jobs during May, according to CNBC. Instead, a paltry 38,000 jobs were added to payrolls. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 06/01/16

06/01/2016
Everyone makes mistakes. Some people learn from them. In GMO’s March 2016 white paper, James Montier and Philip Pilkington continued to explore the Federal Reserve’s influence on the stock market. It was a process they’d begun in 2015 as they sought “…to understand why our forecast for the S&P 500 had been too pessimistic over the last two decades or so.” Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 05/24/16

05/24/2016
A mobile trivia game maker recently assessed the playing habits of Americans and identified the most popular topics by state. As it turns out, Alabamians like college football questions, Alaskans like queries about U.S. states, Rhode Island natives prefer inquiries about the human body, and Wisconsinites love their Green Bay Packers. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 05/17/16

05/17/2016
When is a door not a door? The answer, of course, is: When it’s ajar. Investors and analysts were trying to find the answer to a different riddle last week: When are strong retail sales not strong retail sales? The answer is: When the retailers are department stores. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 05/10/16

05/10/2016
Reading economic portents can be tricky. For example, do signs that economic growth is slowing – like last week’s employment report, which was anemic relative to consensus forecasts, and first quarter’s gross domestic product (GDP) growth – mean the economy is headed for trouble? Or, does it mean the economy is going to continue to grow slowly? Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 05/03/16

05/03/2016
“Which would you prefer to be: a medieval monarch or a modern office-worker?” If you immediately answered medieval monarch, take a moment to ponder life without “…modern dentistry, antibiotics, air travel, smartphones, and YouTube.” Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 04/26/16

04/26/2016
U.S. stock markets finished last week in heady territory. The Dow Jones Industrial Average closed at 18,003. Its all-time closing high is 18,312. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index was less than 1 percent below its intraday trading record, which was set last year. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 04/19/16

04/19/2016
Isn’t it remarkable that China’s growth is so consistent? A columnist from The Washington Post once opined that China “produces an astonishing number of astonishing numbers.” Last week’s GDP announcement, which helped push markets higher, may fall into that category. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 04/12/16

04/12/2016
We all learned a thing or two about Panama last week. The country is not the home of the Panama hat, which is made in Ecuador. However, it is the only place in the world where you can watch the sun rise on the Pacific Ocean and set on the Atlantic Ocean. It’s also home to a lot of offshore companies, according to the millions of records leaked from the world’s fourth largest offshore law firm. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 04/05/16

04/05/2016
It’s like déjà vu all over again! This wasn’t the first quarter, or even the first year, that bond markets have not performed in the way Wall Street strategists have expected. During 2014, bond yields were expected to rise. They did not. During 2015, bonds were predicted to finish the year yielding about 2.8 percent to 3.3 percent. On December 31, they were at about 2.3 percent. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 03/29/16

03/29/2016
Are corporations in the United States struggling? In its cover article last week, The Economist (a British publication), suggested there is not enough competition among American companies. It pointed out: “Aggregate domestic profits are at near-record levels relative to GDP… High profits might be a sign of brilliant innovations or wise long-term investments were it not for the fact that they are also suspiciously persistent..." Read More