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Retirement Investment Advisors, Inc. Names Andrew Flinton, CFP® President

Andrew

Randy Thurman, CFP® has been appointed Chief Executive Officer. Founder Joe Bowie, CFP® moves to a Senior Advisor role. These leadership appointments are effective immediately.

“We are fortunate to have someone with Andrew’s experience and vision to continue our legacy,” said CEO Randy Thurman, CFP®. “Andrew’s unique combination of integrity, intellect, and charisma make him the perfect person to lead us as we embark on our next chapter.”

Flinton said, “I’ve been blessed with great mentors and a talented group of professionals. We are excited to continue to work together to make Retirement Investment Advisors the top fee-only firm in Oklahoma.”

Flinton is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional and has worked as a comprehensive financial planner since 2008. He holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of Oklahoma.  He serves as a member of the Investment Policy Committee for Retirement Investment Advisors and is directly involved in the investment selection and allocation guidelines for the firm. Andrew is a volunteer and Board member for Tenaciously Teal, a non-profit that supports those during their fight with cancer.  He has also been involved with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, American Cancer Society, and has served as a volunteer at OU Children’s Hospital.   Andrew lives in Edmond with his wife Courtney and their two daughters.  

Based in Oklahoma City, with offices in Edmond and Frisco, Texas, Retirement Investment Advisors, Inc. is set apart because all of their financial advisors are CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals, which requires additional training and certification. They have been cited by more than 35* national publications as one of the nation’s top financial planning companies.

*Criteria available upon request

 

 

Blog

Weekly Market Commentary- 10/25/16

10/25/2016
“Verrrry interesting.” Arte Johnson’s catch phrase from Rowan & Martin’s Laugh-In may not have described U.S. stock markets last week, but there were some interesting economic, cyber-security, and consumer developments around the world. Major U.S. stock indices finished the week slightly higher. Experts, cited by Barron’s, suggested markets seemed tired and were waiting for clarity around the U.S. election outcome, Federal Reserve rate increase, and corporate quarterly earnings. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 10/18/16

10/18/2016
‘Tis the season! Third quarter earnings season, that is. Every quarter, companies report earnings to let investors know how profitable the companies were during the quarter. When profits grow, a company’s share price may move higher. When profits decline, a company’s share price may move lower. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 10/11/2016

10/11/2016
Was it good news or wasn’t it? The U.S. unemployment rate ticked higher last week. The September jobs report showed the United States added 156,000 new jobs in September. That was 16,000 fewer than economists were expecting and 11,000 fewer than were added in August, according to Barron’s. That doesn’t sound like good news, does it? Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 10/04/16

10/04/2016
Markets were relatively calm during the third quarter of 2016, yet they delivered some attractive returns overall. In the United States, all three major U.S. indices posted record highs twice during a single 7-day period in August, reported CNBC.com. The Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (S&P 500) experienced a 51-day streak without at least a 1 percent decline. The index returned 3.3 percent in the third quarter. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 09/27/16

09/27/2016
As expected… The U.S. Federal Reserve left rates unchanged last week and markets celebrated. Across the globe, national stock market indices finished the week higher. In the United States, the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index and NASDAQ gained more than 1 percent. Not everyone was thrilled with the decision, however. Three Federal Reserve presidents cast dissenting votes. All believed interest rates should move higher. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 09/20/16

09/20/2016
If it’s not one thing, it may be another. Economic data released last week will factor into this week’s Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) decision on whether to push interest rates higher in the United States. Some of the August data supports the idea economic growth was soft. For example, August retail sales fell more than expected, down 0.3 percent from July. Other data was as expected: U.S. producer prices were flat, which was in line with expectations. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/30/16

08/30/2016
Attention investors: U.S. interest rates may be moving up and it might happen this year. During last Friday’s speech at the Federal Reserve’s annual economic symposium in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Fed Chairwoman Janet Yellen signaled that a rate hike is probably coming but, as usual, she didn’t offer any specifics about the timing. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/23/16

08/23/2016
Last week, Wall Street was speculating about monetary policy with the enthusiasm of commentators trying to predict who will bring home Olympic gold. The Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) is expected to introduce another rate hike before the end of 2016, according to the BBC, and it has just three opportunities to deliver the goods – during its September, November, or December meetings. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/16/16

08/16/2016
How do you measure stock market valuation? If you look at conventional measures – like price-to-earnings (P/E) ratios – then U.S. stock markets appear to be pricey. The Wall Street Journal reported trailing 12-month P/E ratios are high when compared to 10-year averages. High P/E ratios haven’t dampened investors’ interest in U.S. stocks, and share prices have been moving higher. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/09/16

08/09/2016
It’s déjà vu all over again! The Chicago Board of Options Exchange (CBOE) Volatility Index, also known as the VIX, tracks the prices of options on the Standard & Poor’s 500 (S&P 500) Index. Since options often are used to hedge portfolio risk, the VIX is considered to be a ‘fear gauge’ that has value with regard to market volatility during the next 30 days. The VIX moves higher when investors are worried and lower when they’re feeling content. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 08/02/16

08/02/2016
Here’s a brain tickler for you: In July 2016, there were four. In June 2016, there were 10. Since 2008, there have been 673! What are they? If you guessed central bank rate cuts, you are on the money. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary - 7/26/16

07/28/2016
The Markets Like a cool breeze on a hot day, the post-Brexit market rally has soothed investors. The CBOE Volatility Index (VIX), also known as the fear gauge, fell significantly during the past few weeks, according to CNBC.com. The VIX measures investors’ concerns about future volatility. The lower the Index is; the calmer investors are about the future. In late June, the VIX rose as high as 25.76. Last week, it hovered around 12. Barron’s reported the latest advisory sentiment reading Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 07/19/16

07/19/2016
“Start your engines,” was not in the Department of Labor (DOL)’s June Employment Report Summary, but it may as well have been. A positive jobs report revved investor optimism and sent U.S. stock markets sprinting higher last week. Job growth was strong in June with 287,000 new jobs created. That helped soothe worries raised by a less than stellar May jobs report. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 07/12/16

07/12/2016
When the yield on 10-year Treasuries finished last week at 1.37 percent, a record closing low, Barron’s called it a Kübler-Ross rally. Elizabeth Kübler-Ross was a Swiss psychiatrist whose research identified the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. According to Barron’s, institutional money managers have reached the final stage of grief and accepted that bond yields may remain low for some time. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary-07/06/16

07/06/2016
Second quarter ended with a spectacular finale of Brexit-inspired market volatility. Investors typically welcome sharp market movements with about the same level of enthusiasm that canines show for fireworks. However, recent market agitations highlighted a key tenet of investing: Volatility often creates opportunity. Following an initial Brexit sell-off, global markets rebounded. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 06/28/16

06/28/2016
SURPRISE! Britain is leaving the European Union (EU) after 40 years of membership. Last Thursday, almost three-fourths of voters in Britain – about 30 million people, according to the BBC – cast ballots to determine whether the United Kingdom would remain in the EU. By a slim margin, the British people opted out. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary-06/21/16

06/21/2016
The world’s stock markets took it on the chin last week. A one-two punch was delivered with the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting leading and concerns Britain will leave the European Union following. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary-06/14/16

06/14/2016
The British may be leaving. The British may be leaving. Last week, the interest rate on 10-year U.S. Treasuries dropped to levels last seen in 2013. Why, you may ask, would bond yields move lower when Federal Reserve policy is to push interest rates higher? The answer can be found across the pond. On June 23, the United Kingdom, a.k.a. Britain, will vote on whether the country should remain in the European Union (EU) or leave. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 06/07/16

06/07/2016
Statistics means never having to say you're certain, and that was certainly true last week. The employment report, which was released on Friday, was a bit short on jobs. Analysts had predicted employers would add about 162,000 new jobs during May, according to CNBC. Instead, a paltry 38,000 jobs were added to payrolls. Read More

Weekly Market Commentary- 06/01/16

06/01/2016
Everyone makes mistakes. Some people learn from them. In GMO’s March 2016 white paper, James Montier and Philip Pilkington continued to explore the Federal Reserve’s influence on the stock market. It was a process they’d begun in 2015 as they sought “…to understand why our forecast for the S&P 500 had been too pessimistic over the last two decades or so.” Read More