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Retirement Investment Advisors, Inc. Names Andrew Flinton, CFP® President

Andrew

Randy Thurman, CFP® has been appointed Chief Executive Officer. Founder Joe Bowie, CFP® moves to a Senior Advisor role. These leadership appointments are effective immediately.

“We are fortunate to have someone with Andrew’s experience and vision to continue our legacy,” said CEO Randy Thurman, CFP®. “Andrew’s unique combination of integrity, intellect, and charisma make him the perfect person to lead us as we embark on our next chapter.”

Flinton said, “I’ve been blessed with great mentors and a talented group of professionals. We are excited to continue to work together to make Retirement Investment Advisors the top fee-only firm in Oklahoma.”

Flinton is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professional and has worked as a comprehensive financial planner since 2008. He holds a B.A. in Economics from the University of Oklahoma.  He serves as a member of the Investment Policy Committee for Retirement Investment Advisors and is directly involved in the investment selection and allocation guidelines for the firm. Andrew is a volunteer and Board member for Tenaciously Teal, a non-profit that supports those during their fight with cancer.  He has also been involved with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, American Cancer Society, and has served as a volunteer at OU Children’s Hospital.   Andrew lives in Edmond with his wife Courtney and their two daughters.  

Based in Oklahoma City, with offices in Edmond and Frisco, Texas, Retirement Investment Advisors, Inc. is set apart because all of their financial advisors are CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ professionals, which requires additional training and certification. They have been cited by more than 35* national publications as one of the nation’s top financial planning companies.

*Criteria available upon request

 

 

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